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of the state of michigan. she led the fight working with senator roberts. and they worked together not just on the substance but worked together in a manner that allowed it to be bipartisan. i've made it a priority in my work representing the people of pennsylvania to keep pennsylvania's agricultural industry and our rural economy strong to support families in pennsylvania. agriculture is our state's largest industry. pennsylvania's farm gain value -- which is another way of describing cash receipts to growers -- and the last number that we have, which is a 2010 number, was $5.7 billion. a lot of people who probably haven't spent much time in pennsylvania think of it as a -- a state of big cities and small towns but they may miss the -- the substantial agricultural economy that we have. agribusiness in our state is a $46.4 billion industry. 17.5% of pennsylvanians are employed in the so-called food and fiber system. and one of the questions we have to ask is: what does this all mean? well, i think it certainly means that at least we need a five-year farm bill, not -- not a short-term farm b
at what is happening in michigan, thousands of union supporters turned out on the steps of the capitol to protest right to work measures. the measure passed. taking a look at the front page of "the detroit free press," "the law that is not over." "unions will not go down without a fight. recall efforts and legal challenges are possible." there you can see a union representative struggling with michigan state police yesterday over right to work legislation. here is the story -- host: "the washington post" has a map of right to work law states. "the wall street journal" take a look -- takes a look at which states are the most union heavy. the biggest ones are new york, alaska, hawaii, and washington. michigan comes right in behind washington. which is why "the wall street journal" goes with the headline that this is a blow in a particularly union dominated state. looking at some other news, this one out of the south, for "the new york times," "the gop control in north carolina, with a republican controlled legislature, long a politically moderate player will soon have its most conservati
of the coverage begins at 2:00 p.m. eastern. >> meantime, tensions boiling over in michigan. big labor unleashing its fury as the governor writes a right to work legislation into law. a live report from there next. goldman sachs ceo live from the deal book conference in a cnbc exclusive. what's his take on the fiscal cliff, the economy and regulatory land scape. [ male announcer ] with wells fargo advisors envision planning process, it's easy to follow the progress you're making toward all your financial goals. a quick glance, and you can see if you're on track. when the conversation turns to knowing where you stand, turn to us. wells fargo advisors. ♪ [ male announcer ] 'tis the season to discover the kid in all of us. enjoy free shipping and great values on your holiday shopping from l.l. bean. >> meantime, tensions boiling regulatory landscape. >>> welcome back. i wanted to take a look at shares of berkshire hathaway. earlier, right at the open, berkshire shares were halted. it was unclear why. then we got the news, a significant repurchase of -- or purchase, i should say, of shares from a s
: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from michigan. ms. stabenow: thank you, mr. president. mr. president, i rise today to bring attention a critically important piece of legislation that the senate has passed and that the house needs to pass immediately. it passed the senate with bipartisan support. there are those on both sides of the aisle in the house of representatives that support passing it and i'm here to urge in the strongest terms possible that the speaker bring this bill up before the house and get it passed. now, many people, because of my speaking in the past, may be i'm referring to the farm bill, which i also believe we need to have the house take up and pass, because of our bipartisan work, but i actually after referring today to the fact that we have only 27 days until we go over the fiscal cliff, or for middle-class families, what this means is 27 days before their taxes go up on average $2,200. so what we're talking about is the fact that we passed a bil bill -- we didn't just pass a bill. we passed a bill in july, july 25 of this year, the sen
the gentleman from michigan, mr. curson, for five minutes. mr. curson: thank you, mr. chairman. i ask unanimous consent that all members have five legislative days in which to revise and extend their remarks and to insert material into the record on the subject of representative emanuel cleaver's retirement as chair of the congressional black caucus. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. curson: i, too, offer my congratulations to representative cleaver for his service to all americans as the c.b.c. chair. millions of americans are out of work through no fault of their own. millions of americans are relying on federally funded benefits to make ends meet and -- as the nation starts recovering. these long-term benefits for the unemployed will immediately and completely stop on december 29, 2012, unless we in congress act. there is no phaseout. every individual receiving those benefits now will be cut off cold. the department of labor estimates that over two million americans will lose their emergency benefits at the end of the year, including over 92,000 people in my home state of michi
, michigan, a republican caller. go ahead, frank. caller: yes. look, first of all, we need to find out like exactly who is mentally ill and who's not mentally ill and the rimets need to be like finish if someone lives in a house who is mentally ill, obviously, we cannot have weapons of any kind within their range. that's what the law should be. the law shouldn't be we shouldn't just outlaw all weapons we should just outlaw anyone who is obviously with mental issues. the guy who in virginia tech, he had a depression issue. he went to a doctor and still somehow got his hands on two .9 millimeter weapons and you can't tell me that the guy in colorado didn't have mental issue. you can just look at the guy and know that there's something wrong there. we just with to keep the weapons like out of the household or how far range for these people who have mental health. host: frank, the questions that you pose, who are the mentally ill, we will ask those types of questions tomorrow on "washington journal." we're going to have a roundtable discussion with a republican and a democrat who co chair the m
pro tempore: the gentlewoman's time has expired. the chair recognizes the gentleman from michigan, mr. curson, for five minutes. mr. curson: i ask unanimous consent to address the house for five minutes. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. mr. curson: thank you. my thanks to the chair. today i rise to recognize mrs. carolyn coleman, executive secretary to the secretary treasurer of the international union u.a.w., on her retirement. as a member of congress, it is both my privilege and honor to recognize mrs. coleman for her many years of service and her contributions which have enriched and strengthened our communities. mrs. coleman brings a lifetime of experience to her current position to the united auto workers, a career which began in july of 1967 in the u.a.w.'s women's department. carolyn's skill and knowledge led her to be selected to premiere assignments. she directly assisted many great union leaders in their important work. including u.a.w. vice president's dick shoemaker, and carl raveson, as well as u.a.w. president owen bieber, and treasurer dennis rayh
this money, where is it going to end? host: our last call is going to be from michigan. we have shelley on the independent line. what do you think about the president's remarks or the fiscal cliff beck's caller: -- fiscal fliff? caller: there was not much else he could save. they are not going to make an agreement. this is why they are called the do nothing congress. they do not do anything. the republicans, to me -- i feel they let the people belong to the tea party make the stamps for them. even if some of them what to compromise, the tea party gets in there. for some reason, they listen to them. it is a shame, her because most americans, they need help. we need help. and we do not get anything. in michigan, where i live, the governor has knocked down the unions, you know? he has done the teachers terrible. now, we have to spend more money on our social security. all of us should protest. i do not care what city or state we belong in. we should protest against this do-nothing congress. host: you can always check out our special page on our website, set up for all things related to the
arbor, michigan, is domino's ceo patrick draw. patrick, are you -- can you do this? i really should recuse myself. i had -- >> he's already been eating the pea sxwap. >> and last night i ordered two pizzas and garlic bread. it was like $31, patrick. you guys are -- you're doing all right for yourself. i have to let becky do this interview because i'm bias. >> and did you deliver those pizzas? i don't think you did. i think we already did some -- how is pizza? you redid the menu. are you where you want to be in terms of the new menu and quality at dominos? >> yeah, we absolutely are. business has been great the last couple of years. you know, through the third quarter it was still strong this year. worry about europe a little bit. we've still held together there. that's the region of the world we worry about more than others. asia is still strong. latin america has held up pretty well. >> do you have plans to get any healthier? is that something -- i'm not saying you're not, but you know the way to political winds are blowing, you've seen mcdonald has some success and, you know, we'r
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9